The subject of all my work is labour, the actions and routines we commit our time and bodies to.

We all learn or create certain acts and rituales that order our time and allow us to make sense of the world. This labour takes the form of objects and ideas we introduce to the world, the marks we place on the world, and also the marks these objects and ideas leave on us.

In London I worked on construction sites when I was at art school. I got obsessed by the labour and transformation taking place there, and spent a long time exploring this subject during my residencies at the British museum and the V&A museum. But here in Mexico I have branched out, responding to many forms of labour, from street cleaners to chefs, from people making orange juice, to people making shoes.

I work in many disciplines but drawing is at the core of my practice, I use it mostly for research more than creating finished works, it provides a space to understand the patterns within the situation I am looking at, through what I observe and the conversations it generates. As my understanding grows I start to suggest small acts of my own that can feed back into what I am looking at.

A recurring theme of my work is to use the materials, processes, and physical space of the subjects I study to present my ideas. For all my time working at the British museum, I presented myself as just another trade on the construction site, amongst the carpenters, electricians, steel workers, etc. making my contribution towards the project. At the V&A I suggested a concrete bowling competition to take place on the construction site between the staff of the V&A and the construction team, in order to create a meeting between these two groups, and also to contribute my own transformation of that space. In Mexico City I pushed 40 cameras, all made from materials found, borrowed or bought on the street outside the gallery space of ‘1mes 1artista’, I then pushed the cameras through the streets on a cart, mirroring the many other people pushing carts through Mexico City. I copy my environment, wanting to fit in, but also wanting to suggest something new.

These acts take the form of interruptions of the necessary with the unnecessary, but I also seek permission, I am interested in the processes negotiation, convincing people that the unnecessary should become necessary, finding a place for my work to exist amongst everyone elses.

I have been working in Queretaro, Mexico since January 2016. Between 2014 and 2015 I was artist in residence at the V&A, before this I spent four years on a self initiated residency at the British Museum. I graduated from the Royal College of Art in 2006 and have exhibited in group and solo shows thoughout the UK and Mexico. My work is in the public collections of the British Museum and V&A, aswell as private collections.